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Identifier 000421853
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Title Modelling and simulation of deformation localization in fibrous extracellular matrix induced by contractile fibroblasts
Alternative Title Μοντελοποίηση και προσομοίωση των παραμορφώσεων στον extracellular matrix που εισάγονται από κύτταρα που συστέλλονται
Author Καλαϊτζίδου Χρυσοβαλάντου
Thesis advisor Ροζάκης, Φοίβος
Reviewer Παυλίδης, Παύλος
Ποϊράζη Παναγιώτα
Abstract Living tissues are not just collections of packed cells. Much of a tissue’s capacity consists of extracellular space which is largely filled by a complex meshwork, the Extracellular Matrix (ECM). Many cells bind to components of the extracellular matrix, which are mainly fibrous proteins (fibers). This cell-to-ECM adhesion is regulated by specific cell-surface cellular adhesion molecules. When cells contract, i.e. reduce their volume, they exert loads on the fibers and thereby deforming the Extracellular Matrix. The displacement or stress fields, that these deformations result in, serve as signals to other cells. As a respond to these signals, neighboring cells can detect and even approach each other. This mechanical property of a cell’s microenvironment is essential for many of its processes, including cell division, differentiation, migration and morphogenesis. In the current study, we implement a two dimensional discrete model of a fiber network to capture localized deformations induced by one or two contracting cells. We develop a constitutive model, for which the stored energy function of the network is formulated by starting from a nonlinear stress-stretch relation of a single fiber. We minimize the network’s total energy and investigate the resulting deformations which support predictions from previously conducted experiments, including the long-range propagation of displacements induced by one contractile cell and the formation of tether-like bands between two contractile cells, mechanisms that have been associated with a number of essential cellular functions.
Language English
Subject Biomechanics
Εκβιομηχανική
Issue date 2019-3-27
Collection   Faculty/Department--School of Medicine--Department of Medicine--Post-graduate theses
  Type of Work--Post-graduate theses
Permanent Link https://elocus.lib.uoc.gr//dlib/a/1/f/metadata-dlib-1553849826-236163-12155.tkl Bookmark and Share
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