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Identifier 000417588
Title Βιοηθικά διλήμματα στην πρωτογενή και δευτερογενή πρόληψη των καρκίνων
Alternative Title Bioethic dilemmas in primary and secondary prevention of cancer
Author Σιβαρόπουλος, Νεκτάριος
Thesis advisor Φιλαλήθης, Αναστάσιος
Reviewer Τσινόρεμα, Σταυρούλα
Πετούση, Βασιλική
Abstract Cancer is now a social scourge and its prevention is an imperative practice, as long as there is high mortality and morbidity due to it, and significant financial resources devoted to health are absorbed. Prevention is mainly driven by interventions of the organized state with Public Health programs and policies, or voluntarily through private actors, motivated by the Justice and Solidarity Principle. In the course of public health practices and in particular cancer prevention, injuries are often produced that outweigh the potential benefits, physical, mental and social and often serious ethical dilemmas concerning the principles of distributive and social justice, solidarity, individual responsibility, personal freedom consisting of issues of complete and informed consent and consequent free choice and other principles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the moral foundation of these prevention processes in public health so as to ensure equal respect for the personality, interests and goods of all. To achieve universal health care of the population in moral terms. Equal benefits should be given, equal damage prevented, autonomy guaranteed, freedom of action, equal access to health services, fair distribution of resources to all social goods, and equal opportunities for health services Safeguarding human dignity, positive and negative personal rights, meeting support needs for the weak, deterring them from marginalization and stigmatization. Finally, to reduce health inequalities, which are also social inequalities. The purpose of our research is to highlight the specific view of public health prevention policies and practices, to analyze the bioethical dilemmas and the principles that should characterize prevention, to answer the question of the prioritization of the importance of bioethical principles, if justice is more important than solidarity or not, the role of individual responsibility as a criterion for a fair distribution of resources. The principle of Humanitarian Solidarity is a key and important value in the public health ethics and, together with Justice, they make up a crucial diptych ideal. Both collective values are extremely critical to public health, with regard to prevention policies in the general population and in relation to other more individual values such as autonomy, which are more of an interest in individual medical care. The Principle of Justice is the dominant moral principle and the highest human value of all and under its sovereignty, human dignity, equality and justice are guaranteed universally and in terms of unselfishness. The essence of Justice is more important than Solidarity in public health matters, but it is not enough to ethically establish public health The concept of Solidarity strives to capture the commitment to ensuring the well-being of others, emphasizing the importance of identifying personal identities and promoting dignity in the context of interpersonal relationships. This does not mean that Justice must be rejected on public health policies, care and applications for solidarity, and solidarity should not be considered as an alternative concept of distributive justice. Solidarity is only intended to correct any imperfections and failures of justice in the practice of public health policies. With regard to Redistributive Justice and Individual Responsibility, a political decision on the sharing of social goods by individual responsibility for bad behavior should not be affected, since individual responsibility should not be attributed to those whose health consequences, that is to say, their illness does not come from bad choices, but it is a matter of social coincidences and a human lottery. Anyway, the state cannot be solely responsible for the individual and collective health of citizens. There is co-responsibility of the state and the people. Cancer is now a social scourge and its prevention is an imperative practice, as long as there is high mortality and morbidity due to it, and significant financial resources devoted to health are absorbed. Prevention is mainly driven by interventions of the organized state with Public Health programs and policies, or voluntarily through private actors, motivated by the Justice and Solidarity Principle. In the course of public health practices and in particular cancer prevention, injuries are often produced that outweigh the potential benefits, physical, mental and social and often serious ethical dilemmas concerning the principles of distributive and social justice, solidarity, individual responsibility, personal freedom consisting of issues of complete and informed consent and consequent free choice and other principles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the moral foundation of these prevention processes in public health so as to ensure equal respect for the personality, interests and goods of all. To achieve universal health care of the population in moral terms. Equal benefits should be given, equal damage prevented, autonomy guaranteed, freedom of action, equal access to health services, fair distribution of resources to all social goods, and equal opportunities for health services Safeguarding human dignity, positive and negative personal rights, meeting support needs for the weak, deterring them from marginalization and stigmatization. Finally, to reduce health inequalities, which are also social inequalities. The purpose of our research is to highlight the specific view of public health prevention policies and practices, to analyze the bioethical dilemmas and the principles that should characterize prevention, to answer the question of the prioritization of the importance of bioethical principles, if justice is more important than solidarity or not, the role of individual responsibility as a criterion for a fair distribution of resources. The principle of Humanitarian Solidarity is a key and important value in the public health ethics and, together with Justice, they make up a crucial diptych ideal. Both collective values are extremely critical to public health, with regard to prevention policies in the general population and in relation to other more individual values such as autonomy, which are more of an interest in individual medical care. The Principle of Justice is the dominant moral principle and the highest human value of all and under its sovereignty, human dignity, equality and justice are guaranteed universally and in terms of unselfishness. The essence of Justice is more important than Solidarity in public health matters, but it is not enough to ethically establish public health The concept of Solidarity strives to capture the commitment to ensuring the well-being of others, emphasizing the importance of identifying personal identities and promoting dignity in the context of interpersonal relationships. This does not mean that Justice must be rejected on public health policies, care and applications for solidarity, and solidarity should not be considered as an alternative concept of distributive justice. Solidarity is only intended to correct any imperfections and failures of justice in the practice of public health policies. With regard to Redistributive Justice and Individual Responsibility, a political decision on the sharing of social goods by individual responsibility for bad behavior should not be affected, since individual responsibility should not be attributed to those whose health consequences, that is to say, their illness does not come from bad choices, but it is a matter of social coincidences and a human lottery. Anyway, the state cannot be solely responsible for the individual and collective health of citizens. There is co-responsibility of the state and the people.
Language Greek
Subject Aλληλεγγύη
Cancer prevention
Justice
Public health policies
Solidarity
Δημόσια υγεία
Δικαιοσύνη
Πρόληψη καρκίνων
Issue date 2016
Collection   Faculty/Department--Faculty of Letters--Department of Philosophy & Social Studies--Post-graduate theses
  Type of Work--Post-graduate theses
Permanent Link https://elocus.lib.uoc.gr//dlib/a/f/d/metadata-dlib-1535445270-292545-1592.tkl Bookmark and Share
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